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Posts Tagged ‘artwork’

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Today I did something I have never wanted to do. I like to buy all my art supplies at local businesses…like Dick Blick or Utrecht to support these business who also serve art students. I do this because I remember needing something right away right away in school to work on a piece and I was always so grateful to be able to run to Utrect or Dick Blick or even Michael’s to pick it up. The stores would be gloriously stocked with anything you could ever want and most often you’d buy something cool while gathering a necessity. If Utrect or Blick stores were too far and it was an ART EMERGENCY (they exist!!), I would go to Michaels. Today I needed a tube of Windsor & Newton Quinacridone paint for a commissioned painting.  When I perused online, Utrect/Blick was going to cost me $30 for a small tube! Crazy high cost! So…I check Michaels and learned that they had it cheaper, however they don’t carry professional grade supplies in all their stores any longer.  If I purchased it online I would have to pay $10 to get it relatively quickly…like within 10 days. So…while I fidgeted in my seat (because of my desire to support local) I checked out Amazon…ding! Not only did I get it cheaper, but they will ship it free to receive it by tomorrow. I feel like I may have just sold a piece of my soul to the online devil and I feel really bad to do this…but businesses and e-commerce, I hope, will figure out a better solution. Some places, like Home Depot, will let you snag something online from their store and pick it up down the street relatively quickly and I wish more stores would do that. Perhaps someday I will be able to seek out smaller art supply stores that may be of assistance. Sigh….I am just happy to be able to get my paint by tomorrow.

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Well, we moved…hmmm…moved seems too inadequate a word to describe relocating yourself and all your life’s belongings to the other side of the country that no longer resembles anything from before.  I guess that’s what happens when you take a Midwest girl and plunk her down in the desert.  It has been 63 profound days in Scottsdale, Arizona, yet feels like a year away from home. How long do you suppose before a new place becomes “home”? Thankfully, my past reflections can help me determine that answer.

When I first created this blog, I never had any clue how important it would be…to myself. As a kid (or adult) I never journaled or had a diary…I had a great memory instead. But what I never realized about those memories, is how affected they can be by emotional location (where your emotions are at the time of remembering). For that, this blog has become an invaluable tool to myself. I can look back and feel just where my emotional location was at various moments in my life over these past years.

We’ve done this before; relocated back in 2010 from the Chicago area to the Milwaukee area for only 15 months. While I was less than 2 hours from home, it still felt a world away. On a dark emotional day (perhaps homesick) I wrote a blog post comparing being an artist to “The Unbearable Lightness of Being” by Kundera.  In reading that post again…this is the message that I try to carry with me wherever I am…

Being an artist is also about sharing a particular view of the world.  I believe we look at common things with an uncommon eye.  We feel emotional impulses from objects, ideas, inspirations.  I don’t believe that just because we happen to have a job as a counselor, waitress, customer service rep, or assistant that we lose our ability to see and feel the world as we artists do. 

Yes, we live this particular life only once.  However, we do live for a lifetime in which we create a lifetime of artwork.  For some that may be 10,000 pieces of artwork and for others it may mean 3.  The important thing to remember is to be kind to yourself while surviving your life, embrace your artistic self in all that do (art and non-art related), and do something creative each day even if it’s cooking something different or taking a photograph with your smart phone.

There is an unbearable lightness or likeness of being an artist, but the defining moment is how you choose to allow it to define you.

So, these days while the sun is shining upon my face here in the desert and I am feeling unrooted, I look back at this and find a way to be kinder to myself and remember that artwork is created over a lifetime and in many different ways.  I also find in these reflections a confirmation of my subject matter and what flowers continue to teach me. For example, cacti (when removed from their connected “siblings”) must harden off a bit before you can put them back into the ground to grow. So, here I am rediscovering my new home, and in that I look forward to growing!

As a side note:  I am so grateful to be living close to and sharing time with my parents again; it has been 20 years since they had left the Midwest. My hubby, Dan, and I have been enjoying getting to know Scottsdale and finding our new studio location! I am equally grateful for my amazing friends who have reached out to me with their love and positive rays of sunshine. When I am feeling “unrooted” I tend to close up, but those who have reached a hand to me….you have made these 63 days profound and I thank you.

 

 

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It recently dawned on me that there is a practice that I partake in that seems second nature to me, but perhaps people don’t have a clear cut idea about.

Whenever I finish a piece of artwork, it is my hope that someone will love it as much as I loved creating it and they will purchase it, take it home (or work), and enjoy the way it enhances their atmosphere! When someone does purchase a piece of my artwork, I am left with a memory of creating that work. The memory of how the images were a struggle to get…just right.  Or the challenge I overcame of colors that at first seemed like a great idea but later….had to be completely changed. But…just memories.

The solution to just having those memories?  Giclee prints! After starting my professional career, I discovered the wonderful world of digital scanning for printing. Now my artwork can be printed from a postage stamp to a billboard – all without losing one brushstroke detail or color quality.

Whenever people visit my studio, I often direct them to the prints of current and previous artwork that has sold. Sometimes they are not aware of exactly what giclee prints are or why they can seem pricey. So, I began to write up something to explain to my patrons about giclee prints and thought I should do the same on this blog. Afterall, that was the sole purpose of the blog to begin with!

What is a Giclee print?

If you have ever seen the term “Giclee” print and thought it seemed expensive for a copy of an artwork, you’re right! But there is a good reason for that. I will try to explain.

Giclee (pronounced zhee-klay) is a French term meaning “spray of liquid”. It demonstrates an evolution of printmaking technology that benefits artists who don’t necessarily wish to mass produce their artwork, but would like to sell copies or archive an image of their artwork.

The original artwork is captured via a high resolution scan and then printed with archival quality inks onto surfaces such as canvas or high quality papers. The giclee printing process provides more optimum details from the artwork and color accuracy than other mediums of reproduction.

Giclee prints are typically created using professional 8-color to 12-color ink jet printers. They can also be referred to as Iris prints.

Once an image is digitally scanned by a professional artwork printer, it can often be printed smaller or much larger and on various surfaces to customize for clients. Digital scanning also allows for better archival filing as the digital images will not deteriorate as negatives and film usually do.

Numerous examples of giclee prints can be found in museums such as the Metropolitan Museum or MOMA. Recent auctions of giclee prints have fetched $10,800 for Annie Liebovitz or $9,600 for Chuck Close.

When you purchase a giclee print of artwork, you are purchasing the artist’s hiring of a reputable digital printer, the materials on which it is printed, and the matting/framing of the giclee print as well. Giclee prints should be matted with acid free matboard to be sure the entire piece maintains its archival quality.

Hope that helps explain things!

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I have heard from family, friends, art collectors, and many others how fabulous it feels to give someone they love artwork for gifts. Not only do you make the person you love happy by giving the amazing artwork, but you make it possible for the artists and artisans to continue pursuing their dreams.  This year, in the Cedar Avenue Studio building, we have expanded our annual Holiday Open Studio event to include guest artists, other small local businesses, children’s activities, as well as charity raffle opportunities. We hope you will join us between 10am-5pm over the weekend of November 8th and 9th!

Items available will be original artwork, jewelry, notecards, bookmarks, calendars, matted prints, framed prints, photography, and so much more. If you have any questions, you can email me at catie@catarzina.com.

We are so proud to also include Christine Welch of The Coffeecake Connection (website) who will be offering up her gluten free treats as well as taking orders for holiday delivery! She has agreed to offer discounts to those who come this weekend to place their orders and assures me she will offer Thanksgiving delivery as well.

1020 Cedar Avenue is located 1/4 mile east of Route 25 and one block north of Route 64 (Main Street). Our building is located behind Reber and Foley and we have plenty of parking available!  Hope to see you there!

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The Cedar Avenue Studio artists hosted a September Soiree in the Skylight Gallery space during the Charlie’s Center for the Arts weekend in St. Charles. Thank you to everyone who came!  A lot of artwork was sold off the walls as well as prints and cards.  It was a great time and something we hope to do again next year! Thank you to Anne Ressman Zabinski, Amy Furio, Laura Stoecker, John Granata, and Al DaValle for participating!

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 SorbetsWebsiteMeet the Sorbets!

This Spring I decided that I wasn’t hitting all my price points in my artwork and therefore wanted to create some artwork that would be available to anyone.

I started with these two pieces, Lime Sorbet and Raspberry Sorbet.  They are each 12″ x 12″, oil on canvas, and float framed in natural pine.  Each piece is priced at $175.  You can see larger images HERE.

Not only are these two pieces affordable, they create an optical illusion due to their compositions.  They are exactly the same size, but look different due to the way the leaves are angled. I thought that was a very cool thing to discover after I painted them!

These pieces can be seen until the end of June as part of the Art Around the Corner in St. Charles. They are located at The Wine Exchange, 1 W. Illinois, St. Charles, IL. 

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CymbaPortfolio  Yep!  It’s officially summertime in Chicago.  The temperatures are hot and the artwork around town is even HOTTER!

Each year from Memorial Day to Labor Day St. Charles, Illinois’ Downtown Partnership hosts Art Around the Corner.  This is a fabulous opportunity for artists to partner with local businesses to showcase and sell their artwork around town.

I am so fortunate to have my work featured at The Wine Exchange, 1 W. Illinois Street (at the Fox River in Fox Island Square), St. Charles, IL.

The Wine Exchange is open Wednesday-Saturday and I am usually there on Friday evenings to meet and greet people who come on by.

For more information you can visit HERE.

This painting is titled Cymba and it was purchased last week at the wine shop.  The new owners of the artwork, along with bystanders, were sharing the various dialogs they felt were happening in the painting and I was thrilled to hear their take on the composition!

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Lately I’ve been the proud owner of a stubborn case of insomnia.  I don’t dare complain about it as it’s really one of those good sort of problems to have.  I have been busy with my new venture of curating/organizing these charitable auction galleries and my schedule has been somewhat eclectic and random.  I am used to being in control of the things in my world and this randomness has been playing havoc with my psyche….in a good way.  But as always, I am spending time on peripheral circumstances and not the point I was trying to make.


So…without further adieu…I’ll get on topic.  My insomnia has me waking up around 3am each morning.  It starts with an occasional shift from side to side but by 4am my conscious brain has caught up with the large intuitive Rolodex spinning in my mind and then the fun begins.  I start to think of all the things I have to do that day and start to pre-plan my travels.  I’m also one of those people who has to have a “pre-rehearsal” of the day’s conversations so I feel like I’m ready.  Well, the next thing I know it’s 6am and Aurora begins to work her magic across the sky.  This is where it gets good….

You see from 6am’ish to about 6:45am there is something magical that takes place in my bedroom.  The colors of my abode are butter yellow, steel-blue, with various wood tones and metals.  But during those magical 45 minutes…everything is measured by value alone…no hues…no saturation of color…no atmospheric perspective.  Just value.  The copper mirror is a dark blue grey on the buttery yellow wall that appears light blue grey.  The white mirror is a very light blue grey just like the white linen lampshades that dangle nervously from the high arched dark steel looking arms.  It really is magical and I wonder if that’s what fascinated Mark Tansey as I think of his monochromatic paintings when I experience this.
But after those 45 minutes, or so, the sunlight starts to skew the pigment atoms in my world and it all comes into colorful view so quickly; almost as quickly as the sun sets on the horizon.  Then my blue grey walls turn yellow, my mirrors become copper and white again, and the brown wood tones come into warmth and no longer shades of cool blue.  Just a thought if you’re ever awake when it’s too early to get up.

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